Tu B'Shvat: What Is A Birthday For Trees?

Posted on January 13th, 2019

This video is featured in Jvillage Network's Tu B'Shevat Guide. For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit here. 


From AlephBeta 


What Is Tu B'Shvat And Why Do We Celebrate?


Every year, we celebrate the strange Jewish holiday of Tu B’Shvat – according to the Talmud, it’s a birthday for all of the trees born in the previous year. And not just a birthday – it’s really a “new year” for the trees. How odd is that? In this video, Imu Shalev breaks down this strange holiday to uncover what Tu B’Shvat really means to us today. Discover how Tu B’Shvat is actually all about gratitude to our Creator, for the fruits of the trees.

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The Modern-day Appeal of Tu B’Shevat

Posted on January 6th, 2019
This article is featured in Jvillage Network's Tu B'Shevat Guide. For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit here. 

By Jenna Weissman Joselit for Tablet Magazine 


The Jewish New Year of the Trees demands little of us, but offers us a chance to connect our roots with good causes, new rituals, and recipes


If ever there was a holiday ripe for revitalization and collective embrace, it’s Tu B’Shevat, the Jewish New Year of the Trees. Falling smack in the middle of winter, when the weather is usually not at its best, the age-old festival, which some scholars date to the early Middle Ages, heralds the prospect of regeneration, of sunnier days ahead. That alone should commend it to North American Jews, lifting their spirits when they sag under the weight of gloves and hats and scarves, their movement impeded by the heavy tread of boots.

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Did You Know There's a Jewish Holiday Every Month?

Posted on December 30th, 2018
from BimBam.com
 

What is Rosh Chodesh?

 

How Jews Celebrate the First Day of Every Month
 

Rosh Chodesh is a minor Jewish holiday that happens on the first day of every month and literally translates to “head of the month”. Watch our explainer video to learn the significance of this monthly holiday.

This holiday has long been considered a special holiday for women. Some say that this is because women of Israel did not offer their jewelry for the creation of the Golden Galf so they were given Rosh Chodesh, a day when they could abstain from work. Others connect the lunar cycle of the holiday to a woman’s menstrual cycle. For thousands of years, Rosh Chodesh has been a holiday where women gather together for a variety of activities, from reciting prayers, to sharing a meal, discussing Jewish ethics and working for social change.


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Why Study Torah?

Posted on December 23rd, 2018
BY CLIVE LAWTON for MyJewishLearning


The tradition of Torah study has built up a tradition of questioning and clarifying which is simply an incomparably rich skill to cultivate.


By Jewish standards, the question “Why study Torah” is a very new one.

For a couple of millennia, studying Torah was just a given for male Jews. Of course you’d learn it — or at least read it in bite-sized chunks every Shabbat in synagogue, in a never-ending cycle where not only was the yearly reading finished and then immediately begun again on the Simchat Torah festival, but each week’s chunk was trailed on Shabbat afternoon with a little preview of the following week’s portion.

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What Is A Mikveh?

Posted on December 16th, 2018
BY SHOSHANNA LOCKSHIN for MyJewishLearning


Whether you're dunking for conversion or for any other reason, here's what to expect at the ritual bath.


A mikveh (pronounced MICKvuh, also spelled mikvah), is a Jewish ritual bath.

Almost every Jewish community has at least one mikveh (you can search here for a traditional mikveh, or here for a non-Orthodox mikveh directory). In larger Jewish communities you might have a choice among mikve’ot (plural for mikveh).

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